Tag Archives: AIU

Mission Spotlight: Pistis School

PICT8845Next week, during Kids Club, our kids will be making canvas bags as a service project for orphans and school children in Kenya. Many of those bags will go to the 85 students who attend Pistis School.

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Some of the bags will be sent out with teams visiting Nairobi area orphanages. The remainder of the bags will go to the 138 students who attend Racefield School which I’ve written about previously: Here is Part 1 and here is Part 2.DSC03385In 2006, The Crossing became involved with Pistis School when one of our members began volunteering there while living in Kenya. Pistis School is an elementary level school located on the edge of Nairobi, Kenya. It provides education for the children of graduate students attending Africa International University (formerly Nairobi Evangelical Graduate School of Theology.) Usually, at least one family member is getting an education at AIU while their kids are attending Pistis School. They are studying education, Bible translation, missions, theology, counseling, business and other disciplines. These graduate students and their families come from dozens of countries in Africa (South Sudan, Congo, Malawi, Mozambique, Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda to name a few). There are also students from Europe and the US. Sometimes, kids are attending Pistis as orphans in the care of extended family members because they have lost their parents due to unrest, civil war, illness or terrorism in their home country. Pistis also educates local kids who are orphans or in financial need.DSC03460

Mission Spotlight: Kenya

One of the main reasons The Crossing started partnerships in Kenya was a desire to train and equip indigenous church leaders to effectively take the gospel to their own people. We are motivated by love for the Kenyan people and a desire for them to know God more deeply. Since 2006, The Crossing has been growing our cooperative connection with New City Fellowship-Nairobi, our main partner church in Kenya, and with the AEPC (African Evangelical Presbyterian Church).

Most AEPC congregations in Kenya are very poor. Almost all are located in remote rural areas, though a few serve urban slum and ethnic minority populations. AEPC pastors are rarely able to complete bible courses at the 2-year diploma level, much less strive for bachelors or masters degrees in theology.

Our partnerships in Kenya now include:

  • pastoral education (including BATS and MATS)
  • Christlike leadership development
  • church planting
  • mentoring indigenous evangelists to reach their own ethnic groups
  • emergency relief
  • racial and tribal reconciliation
  • education and healthcare for marginalized populations including:
    • orphans and vulnerable children
    • refugees